The Yukon: Canada's Isolated Oasis

Soar above the Yukon's forests, ride down the territory's iconic river, and hear from locals on what makes this Canadian destination so exceptional. Monday, 8 April 2019

The world grows quiet here. A gauzy mist rises off the pine-dotted shores of the Yukon River. Sun beams pierce through thick cotton clouds, painting the water in a shimmering glow.

The allure of Canada’s wild northern territory is undeniable. In a single trip, visitors can camp beneath the aurora borealis, which dances across Whitehorse’s star-speckled skies, fly over the marbled ice fields of Kluane National Park, and paddle through the rushing waters of the Yukon River.

Even locals aren’t immune to the Yukon’s wonder.

“It’s like my backyard where I get to go play around in the mountains,” says pilot Alex Lansfield, who regularly flies tourists over Kluane’s ivory glaciers. “As the rest of the world gets more crowded, the Yukon is kind of like a little isolated oasis.”

But this spectacular wilderness is more than its diverse landscapes—it's also history. The Yukon’s earth carries the stories of First Nations groups who settled the territory thousands of years ago and continue to maintain an intimate relationship with the land.

For many of its residents, this special connection with nature is what makes the Yukon magical.

“It feels good to know you’re at the right place,” says local canoe guide Julien Rouget. “When I’m out there, I just feel alive.”

You don’t have to live in the Yukon, however, to fall under its magnetic spell. Whether you’re a Canadian or just passing through, here, everyone is an explorer.

Read More