Photography

Our favourite photos from this week—taken by you

Each week, our editors choose stunning photos submitted by members of Your Shot, National Geographic's photo community. Sunday, 18 November 2018

By Kristen McNicholas

English polymath and inventor Sir John Herschel is credited with giving the word 'photography' its meaning. It’s derived from Greek roots that literally translate to “writing with light.” Isn’t that a beautiful phrase? It’s poetic. Writing with light is how the Your Shot community shares stories. We tell our stories with light hitting a sensor or being exposed on film, or any other way we make photographs.

Lately, I’ve been walking to work from my apartment in Washington, D.C. The best part isn’t the exercise, the fresh air, or being able to avoid rude commuters with no public transportation etiquette (though these are benefits). The best part is getting to know my surroundings while seeing the beautiful morning light (it’s dark here at night now … so no evening golden hour for me). I did manage to capture this evening light a couple weeks ago and that light is—muah! a chef’s kiss.

Though I encounter few moments—in the traditional sense of a moment full of emotion or action between characters—I’ve been finding moments on my walks by following the light. I don’t know where it comes from, but recently the phrase “follow the light and the photograph will follow” has been stuck in my head. So that’s what I’ve been doing: studying the light. I’ve been writing poetry with light. Photography is after all, just writing with light.

It’s a treat, week in and week out, to see how Your Shot photographers write with light.

Before I go for the week, I encourage everyone to check out Your Shot photographer Doug Gimesy’s picture story that was published on natgeo.co.uk this past week about flying foxes in Australia. The Your Shot community is very proud of him and this achievement!

Associate Photo Editor Kristen McNicholas looks at daily uploads from Your Shot, starting each day by sifting through thousands of photographs. This series is a selection of her favourites from the past week.
 

Read More