OUR WORLD IN 2019

WILDLIFE WATCH

FREE SOLO

Free Solo: the film making the world hold its breath

Discover the world of Alex Honnold, the star of Free Solo - the BAFTA nominated National Geographic film following the climber as he attempts his audacious ascent of Yosemite's El Capitan - without ropes.

BEYOND OUR WORLD

1969-2019

human stories

18:35

She donated her body to science, and now she'll live forever

Susan Potter knew in exquisite and grisly detail what was going to happen to her body after death. It seems that for the last 15 years of her life, she lived for Vic Spitzer, the scientist committed to fulfilling her dream of helping medical students become compassionate doctors. For the past 16 years, National Geographic has followed Potter’s life and death and her 3D resurrection to the highest resolution.
0:58

Watch One Family's Journey Through A Life-Changing Face Transplant

We use our faces to kiss, to speak, to express our emotions. What would we do without a face? This short film tells the incredible story of Katie Stubblefield’s face transplant. It's the journey of a devoted family confronting the agony of waiting for a donor, the pins and needles of a 31-hour surgery, and the prospect of a long road to recovery and irrevocably altered lives. To learn more about Katie, go to natgeo.com/katiesface.

Look Familiar To You? These Facial Reconstructions Reveal 40,000 Years of English Ancestry

Do any of these look familiar? A new exhibit sheds light on 40,000 years of British faces

PLANET OR PLASTIC?

animals

1:01

See a giant Amazon spider prey on opossum in video first

February 28, 2019 - This is the first video documentation of a large mygalomorph spider preying on an opossum. While surveying in northern Peru, a team of scientists from University of Michigan found a tarantula dragging a young opossum along the ground. The team was studying interactions between arthropods and small vertebrates in a lowland Amazon rainforest. The study found that arthropod predations accounted for a surprising amount of mortality amongst Amazonian vertebrates. Amazonian spiders tend to rely on modified jaws, massive fangs, and venom to capture vertebrates.

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