Photo gallery: meet the village artisans keeping traditions alive in Le Marche, Italy

For artisan skill, there’s nowhere in Italy like Le Marche, a central region populated with family businesses that handcraft paper from hemp, weave basket bags for Italy’s biggest fashion houses, and stitch the leather balls used in an ancient sport.

Photo story: the celebrated seafood of Stonehaven, Scotland

Stonehaven’s glory days as a thriving fishing village may be behind it, but the culinary legacy of its past remains. Grab yourself a table with a sea view and tuck in to smoked haddock, award-winning fish and chips or fresh lobster. 

Photo gallery: the celebrated seafood of Stonehaven, Scotland

Stonehaven’s glory days as a thriving fishing village may be behind it, but the culinary legacy of its past remains. Grab yourself a table with a sea view and tuck in to smoked haddock, award-winning fish and chips or fresh lobster.

Photo story: Australia's Great Ocean Road

Twisting for 150 miles along the southern coast,  the Great Ocean Road is arguably the country’s most spectacular drive. But this legendary route is more than  a road trip, it’s Australia in microcosm.

Photo gallery: Australia's Great Ocean Road

Twisting for 150 miles along the southern coast,  the Great Ocean Road is arguably the country’s most spectacular drive. But this legendary route is more than a road trip, it’s Australia in microcosm.

Winners revealed: National Geographic Traveller Photography Competition 2020

Announcing the winners of our prestigious annual contest, selected from more than 4,500 entries across four categories.

Photo gallery: the souks, tanneries and timeless leathercraft traditions of Marrakech

Moroccan tanneries are renowned for their quality and craft, and nowhere is the deep-rooted heritage of leatherwork better experienced than the Red City. From raw skins to colourful, expertly crafted goods, the story of Marrakech’s leather-making tradition is one that embodies the city’s thriving cultural identity.

Photo story: the autumn ritual of wild horse herding in Iceland's Kolbeinsdalur Valley

The snow is falling lightly in the Kolbeinsdalur Valley. Everyone is waiting; anticipation lies heavy in the air. A distant rumble of hoofs breaks the silence and over the horizon, right on cue, a herd of more than 500 wild horses thunders into view. Welcome to Laufskálarétt, Iceland’s biggest annual horse round-up.

How I got the shot: Richard James Taylor on capturing the landscapes of New Brunswick

The Restigouche River, in New Brunswick, offers the traveller some of the most wild and remote terrain in Canada. On his latest assignment, photographer Richard James Taylor explored the region, discovering its places and its people.

How I got the shot: Karolina Wiercigroch on capturing nomadic life in Kyrgyzstan

On her latest assignment for National Geographic Traveller Food, Karolina travelled through remote landscapes in the Kyrgyz mountains, capturing the culinary rituals of the region’s nomadic population. We caught up with her to find out how she did it.

Photo story: the ruins, rituals and otherworldly springs of Turkey's Pamukkale region

The shimmering limestone pools of Pamukkale are one of the country’s best-known natural wonders, but at ground level, a lesser-explored corner of Turkey unfolds: a land of fruit trees, patchwork fields and the quiet ruins of ancient cities.

Photo gallery: a testament to faith and devotion in Ethiopia's rock churches

The dramatic rock-hewn churches of Tigray in the Gheralta Mountains have their roots in an age of desert monasticism — it was here in the sub-Saharan kingdom of Aksumite that Christianity was adopted as the state’s sole religion in the fourth century. 

Photo story: a testament to faith and devotion in Ethiopia's rock churches

The rock-hewn churches of Tigray in the Gheralta Mountains have their roots in an age of desert monasticism — it was here in the sub-Saharan kingdom of Aksumite that Christianity was adopted as the state’s sole religion in the fourth century.

Is your travel photography ethical?

Fines are now being issued to tourists in Kyoto who photograph Geishas without their consent. Are we entering an era where common sense must be enforced?