A culinary guide to the Italian city of Bologna, from lasagne to Lambrusco

A culinary guide to the Italian city of Bologna, from lasagne to Lambrusco

This is the cradle of Italy’s world-famous cuisine — an erudite, antique city of twisted streets, forgotten chapels filled with frescoes and imposing temples to scholarship.

Food and travel

What they're eating in Beirut

Topped flatbreads, heritage grains and Armenian cuisine are all on the menu in the Lebanese capital.

Sandy vines and subtle wines in Lisbon's underrated wine region

From the sandy vines of Colares to the ‘sweet spot’ of Alenquer, Lisbon's underrated wine region is producing reds and whites as complex and singular as the local landscape.

The pioneer: Analiese Gregory on her life lessons from global kitchens

New Zealand-born Analiese Gregory has foraged in France, mastered complex gastronomy in Spain and cooked camel in Morocco. Now she’s taken over the kitchen of Franklin in Tasmania, she’s found somewhere that feels like home. 

Sour, salty, sweet: getting a taste for Filipino cuisine

From spit-roasted lechon pork to vinegar-soaked adobo stew, the stars of Filipino food are beginning to make their mark on big-city menus the world over. And the best way to get to know this cuisine is by exploring the capital, Manila.

Breaking bread

Breaking bread: on the trail of tradition in Thessaloniki, Greece's gastronomic heart

Thessaloniki is Greece’s gastronomic heart, a melting pot city that’s constantly evolving. But when it comes to Greek cooking, some things aren’t to be messed with — no matter how modern life gets.

Photo stories

Photo story: dining with nomads in Kyrgyzstan

Once a nation of nomads, today’s Kyrgyzstan is dotted with yurts only in summer. For most of the year, Kyrgyz shepherds live settled lives in the valleys, but from June to September, when the lowlands are arid, they move to summer mountain pastures, known as jailoo. 

Photo story: the story behind the hazelnuts of Piedmont, Italy

The hills just outside Alba, in northwest Italy’s Piedmont region, are striped with neat green rows of trees and vines. The area is renowned for its wines and white truffles, but the jewel in its crown is the nocciola del Piemonte, a delicate variety of hazelnut with thin skin and crisp, dense flesh. The terroir here is ideal for these nuts: the slopes allow the soil to drain, while the altitude and climate provide the perfect temperature for the trees.

Photo story: The London tradition of pie 'n' mash

There can be few institutions more synonymous with the East End of London than pie ’n’ mash shops

Slow burners: a celebration of 21 complex classics that are well worth the wait

Lamb so soft it’s served with a spoon; fiery red relish made from patiently stewed peppers; rich, smoky dhal, cooked for 24 hours. When it comes to food, it often pays to take it nice and slow. We’ve searched the world for those culinary labours of love, whether it’s comforting dishes that need a long, languid simmer or those complex classics requiring time and effort. Here are 20 of the best slow burners worth travelling — and waiting — for.

Meet the maker

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Meet the Maker: saffron in Spain

In central Spain, the Cabra family produces some of the highest-quality saffron in the world.

Meet the maker: the woman behind the world's most sought-after pistachios

In Sicily, Laura Lupo makes products such as pesto and torrone from her own highly prized Bronte pistachios.

Meet the maker: the Canadian maple tree tapper

In rural Quebec, Pierre Faucher has been tapping maple sap and turning it into syrup for almost 40 years.

How I got the shot: photographer Rob Greig on capturing London’s love affair with pie ’n’ mash shops

Looking back at one of our favourite photo stories of last year, photographer Rob Greig shares behind-the-scenes tips and tricks from his shoot for National Geographic Traveller Food.

Photo story: celebrating the characters and creations of London's Chinatown

The food found in Chinatown was once largely Cantonese, but in recent years it’s diversified. Today its outlets specialise in cuisines from all across Asia; the longest queues, though, are outside the bubble tea cafes.

From festivals to foraging tours: the top five food experiences in Ireland

From fine dining restaurants and a cider festival to food markets and a seaweed safari, the island’s culinary experiences all serve up fun with a laid-back vibe.

Beyond banana bread: five recipes from restaurants around the world to try at home

Pining for restaurants and getting slightly bored in the kitchen? Reinvigorate your time with these five exotic recipes from global restaurants featured in National Geographic Traveller Food magazine — everything from goulash to gunkan maki.

Artisan bakes and ancient grains: nine British bakeries doing things differently

Baltic Wild sourdough, cinnamon buns, scalded rye and bara brith are among the delectable wares on offer. And though they might be out of reach right now, you'll want to be first in line when normal service resumes.

Five ways with miso

It’s a Japanese staple, but works across almost any cuisine. Here are five ways to use this highly versatile store-cupboard staple, from a grilled veg glaze to a salted caramel alternative.

What they’re eating in… Houston, Texas

Viet-Cajun crawfish, fried okra tempura and steak: here's what and where to eat in this American metropolis. 

A culinary guide to Amsterdam

The cosmopolitan Dutch capital is a culinary big-hitter, dishing up everything from Indonesian to Israeli cuisine. The common thread? A defiantly down-to-earth approach.
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Soul of Skåne

Skåne, Sweden's verdant southernmost province, is a place to take it slow. Here, travellers can switch off on sandy beaches, wild camp under starry skies and forage in the undergrowth for wild mushrooms. This is what friluftsliv — a Scandinavian term that loosely translates as ‘open-air living’ — is all about. It's also a place where the locals' welcoming spirit, relaxed hospitality and respect for the land are deep-rooted and heart-warming. Experience this region’s astounding variety of locally grown produce with a homemade smoothie made from foraged fruits, or an ice cream flavoured with just-plucked saffron.

Our editors' favourite global cookbooks

Eat your way around the world while you stay at home with our team’s top 10 global cookbooks.

Where to eat Thai green curry from Bangkok to Belfast

From backstreet kitchens in Bangkok to highly rated restaurants in the UK, these are the top spots to try Thai green curry.

Five simple dishes to master at home

If you’re handy in the kitchen, but keen to broaden your repertoire, why not spend your time perfecting these simple classics?

Beyond Napa: on the trail of California's artisan cheesmakers

In the valleys and hillsides just north of San Francisco, artisan cheesemakers are taking advantage of the same varied terroir that produces world-class wines. The result? Unique cheeses flavoured by sea air and forest-lined marshes.

How to spend 14 hours in Galway

From gastro stops to great museums and theatre, the European Capital of Culture 2020 is ripe for exploring — and is arguably Ireland’s most delicious city.
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Discover Armenia’s gastronomic scene, from its ancient wine to its hearty dishes

Armenian cuisine is rich and varied — but it’s the country’s wine, with its time-honoured traditions and distinct flavour, that sets the destination apart for food-lovers.

From challah to injera: 11 ways to fall back in love with bread

Whether you’re a dough addict or a dabbler, bread at its best is true pleasure. From challah to injera, here are 11 reasons to fall back in love with loaves.

The pioneer: Marsia Taha on bringing traditional, local cooking back from the brink of extinction

Marsia Taha, head chef at Gustu, in La Paz, is one of the few Bolivian women at the helm of a top restaurant. Her mission: To bring traditional cooking back from the brink of extinction, supporting local communities in the process. 

How craft spirits are bringing Dublin’s Golden Triangle back to life

After a lost century, Dublin’s Golden Triangle glows again, with new distilleries riding high on Ireland’s craft spirits boom.