Scientists Track Mysterious Green Sea Turtles in the Persian Gulf

Green turtles are something of a mystery in the Middle East, so an international team of researchers are rounding up dozens of turtles to learn more about their migration routes and locations of nesting beaches.

Sea Turtle Rescued From Abandoned 'Ghost Net' Snare

See how an increase in abandoned or ghost nets is causing a rise in trapped animals like this sea turtle. Luckily for this turtle a group of fishermen spotted it and released it but not all marine animals are so lucky. 

Sneaky Turtles Sunbathe on a Hippo's Back

See how sneaky terrapins of Kruger National Park, South Africa use hippos for sunbathing beds. Terrapins regulate their body temperatures with the help of the sun. 
1:18

Rising Temperatures Cause Sea Turtles to Turn Female

Warming temperatures off the coasts of Australia may be having a devastating effect on green sea turtle populations by turning almost all their offspring into females. Sex in sea turtles is determined by the heat of the sand the eggs incubate in. As temperatures rise due to climate change, more and more females are being born. On Raine Island, the Pacific Ocean's largest and most important green sea turtle rookery scientists found that female sea turtles now outnumber males 116 to 1. Raine appears to have been producing almost exclusively females for at least 20 years. It's unclear how turtles are affected worldwide, and other factors like habitat changes may play a role in shifting sex ratios.
1:30

Unlikely Turtle Rescue

This sea turtle was found surrounded—and trapped—by cocaine worth tens of millions of pounds.

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