The global spread of the coronavirus is disrupting travel. Stay up to date on the science behind the outbreak>>

Travel photography tips: Change your viewpoint

Professional photographer Steve Davey presents his travel photography tips. Read his advice for using viewpoint to create a more dramatic shot

Published 24 Jan 2015, 11:00 GMT, Updated 1 Jul 2021, 15:57 BST

Don't take all of your pictures from head height: shoot from higher, or in this case lower to create a more dramatic image. In this case looking down on the snakes would have just shown the tops of their heads, with a background of the paving of the square. A low viewpoint will also change the background of the picture. In order to achieve this snake-level viewpoint, I fitted the camera to a monopod and moved it closer to the snakes with a wideangle lens, triggering the camera with a remote release. This gave a more dramatic view of the snakes and showed the snake charmers in the background. The secret to all photography is to try to show things from a different, more unique perspective. Most times this will involve thinking about the picture before rushing in with a camera; in this instance it also involved getting rather close to a number of Egyptian Cobras! bettertravelphotography.com

Follow @SteveDaveyPhoto
 

Travel Photography Masterclass

Here at National Geographic Traveller, we've teamed up with professional photographer Steve Davey, who will be presenting his travel photography masterclasses at Destinations: The Holiday & Travel show. These two-hour masterclasses will help sharpen your skills, iron out bad habits and give you a better understanding of your camera's functions to enhance your travel images. Book your masterclass, from only £30. Early booking is advised as places are limited. Click here to book your workshop.

 

Read More

Explore Nat Geo

  • Animals
  • Environment
  • History & Culture
  • Science
  • Travel
  • Photography
  • Space
  • Adventure
  • Video

About us

Subscribe

  • Magazines
  • Newsletter
  • Disney+

Follow us

Copyright © 1996-2015 National Geographic Society. Copyright © 2015-2016 National Geographic Partners, LLC. All rights reserved